Adrenocortical steroid antiinflammatory Pharmaceutical Materials Prednisone 21-acetate CAS 125-10-0

Adrenocortical steroid antiinflammatory Pharmaceutical Materials Prednisone 21-acetate CAS 125-10-0

 

Quick Details for Prednisone 21-acetate

Product Name: Prednisone 21-acetate
Synonyms: 11,20-trione,21-(acetyloxy)-17-hydroxy-pregna-4-diene-3;4-diene-3,11,20-trione,17,21-dihydroxy-pregna-21-acetate;delcortin;delta’-dehydrocortisoneacetate;delta-corlin;deltalone;nisone;ACETIC ACID 2-((8S,9S,10R,13S,14S,17R)-17-HYDROXY-10,13-DIMETHYL-3,11-DIOXO-6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17-DODECAHYDRO-3H-CYCLOPENTA[A]PHENANTHREN-17-YL)-2-OXO-ETHYL ESTER
CAS: 125-10-0
MF: C23H28O6
MW: 400.46
EINECS: 204-726-0
Product Categories: Intermediates & Fine Chemicals;Pharmaceuticals;Steroids
Melting point : 240-242°C (dec.)
Storage temp.: Refrigerator.
Chemical Properties : White Solid
Usage : Adrenocortical steroid antiinflammatory .

 

Prednisone 21-acetate Description

Prednisolone acetate drops is used for treating inflammation of the eyes and eyelids due to certain conditions. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Prednisolone acetate drops is an ophthalmic corticosteroid. Exactly how prednisolone acetate drops works is not known

 

Prednisone 21-acetate Application

Prednisolone is a synthetic glucocorticoid, a derivative of cortisol, which is used to treat a variety of inflammatory and auto-immune conditions. It is the active metabolite of the drug prednisone and is used especially in patients with hepatic failure, as these individuals are unable to metabolise prednisone into prednisolone.

Prednisolone is a corticosteroide drug with predominant glucocorticoid and low mineralocorticoid activity, making it useful for the treatment of a wide range of inflammatory and auto-immune conditions such as asthma, uveitis, pyoderma gangrenosum, rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, pericarditis, temporal arteritis and Crohn’s disease, Bell’s palsy, multiple sclerosis, cluster headaches, vasculitis, acute lymphoblastic leukemia and autoimmune hepatitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Kawasaki disease and dermatomyositis. It is also used for treatment of sarcoidosis, though the mechanism is unknown.

Prednisolone acetate ophthalmic suspension (eye drops) is an adrenocortical steroide product, prepared as a sterile ophthalmic suspension and used to reduce swelling, redness, itching, and allergic reactions affecting the eye.

Prednisolone can also be used as an immunosuppressive drug for organ transplants and in cases of adrenal insufficiency (Addison’s disease).

Corticosteroide inhibit the inflammatory response to a variety of inciting agents and, it is presumed, delay or slow healing. They inhibit the edema, fibrin deposition, capillary dilation, leukocyte migration, capillary proliferation, fibroblast proliferation, deposition of collagen, and scar formation with inflammation.

Possible side-effects include fluid retention of the face (moon face, Cushing’s syndrome), acne, constipation, and mood swings.

A lengthy course of prednisolone can cause bloody or black tarry stools from bleeding into the stomach (this requires urgent medical attention); filling or rounding out of the face; muscle cramps or pain; muscle weakness; nausea; pain in back, hips, ribs, arms, shoulders, or legs; reddish-purple stretch marks on arms, face, legs, trunk, or groin; thin and shiny skin; unusual bruising; urinating at night; rapid weight gain; and wounds that will not heal.

Prolonged use of prednisolone can lead to the development of osteoporosis which makes bones more fragile and susceptible to fractures. One way to help alleviate this side effect is through the use of calcium and vitamin D supplements.

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